Spring Conference Cancelled

ceao-logoDue to the COVID-19 pandemic, the CEAO board would like to announce that the 2020 CEAO Conference at Lake Erie College will be moved to the spring of 2021. The conference will retain the same theme and location. A new date will be established and current submissions will be automatically considered for the CEAO 2021 conference (there will be no need to resubmit for those who already did so).

Typically at the spring meeting we make changes to our board, including naming the new president, vice president, and any other positions which will require a new board member to take over.  We also ask if any attendees are interested in becoming board members. Because we are moving this year’s conference all current board members will remain in their positions and we won’t be adding any new members until next year’s conference.

We regret any inconvenience this may cause for those planning to present. We do, however, realize many institutions are no longer offering funding for travel and want to be sure this conference is accessible to those who work within English Studies in Ohio.

If you have already submitted conference registration, please reach out to Anthony Edgington for reimbursement: Anthony.edgington@utoledo.edu

Please feel free to let me know if you have any questions.

All the best,

 

Bryan A. Bardine, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
University of Dayton
President, College English Association of Ohio
Chair, International Society for Metal Music Studies
Bbardine1@udayton.edu

 

2020 Spring Conference CFP

CEAO Spring Conference: Saturday April 25, 2020

Lake Erie College, Painesville, OH

Theme: Fluidity: Mobility in English Studies

Asbury Woods Running Water
Photo Credit: Hannah Vadzemnieks, “Asbury Woods Running Water”

We are pleased to announce the 2020 College English Association of Ohio Conference at Lake Erie College on the shores of Lake Erie. The Great Lakes’ waters suggest fluidity, shifting forces, flexibility, mobility, adaptability, malleability, pliancy, and, for communities on the shores, resilience within dynamic social and natural forces as “Rust Belt” cities along the lake are increasingly being recognized for both their traditions and for their innovations.

Please join us to share ideas that explore the ideas of fluidity and mobility within Writing Studies. We will explore the constants within our study of language, and we will dialogue about how we can create flexible movements within English Studies. Also, we will discuss strategies for resiliency in light of forces that challenge the humanities.

Possible topics might include:

  • Shifting pedagogical practices in literature, composition, creative writing, ESL, and linguistics courses;
  • Flexibility in new ways of reading, writing, assessing and teaching different genres, such as novels, short stories, poems, non-fiction, and digital texts;
  • Mobility in terms of new practices for engaging students in the community, the university/college, and the classroom through civic engagement, service learning, multidisciplinary and other outreach opportunities;
  • Adaptability in terms of research methods implemented by literature, composition, creative writing, professional writing/journalism, ESL and linguistics departments/programs;
  • Malleability in sharing new professional development opportunities;
  • Pliancy in exploring English Studies along with movements like the Digital, Medical and Environmental Humanities;
  • Resiliencence within establishing administrative and programmatic practices within English Studies This might include visions of sustainable and resilient English Studies programs;
  • We also welcome work by creative writers. We will offer panels with time for 15 minute readings of creative works, and/ or creative writers are welcome to apply to lead a 60 minute creative writing workshop.

African-American Literature /American Literature / Assessment and/or Learning Outcomes / British & Irish, Scottish and Welsh Literature / Children’s and Adolescent Literature / Composition and Rhetoric: Practice or Theory / Creative Writing: Fiction and Poetry or Non-Fiction / Disability Studies / Film and Literature / Grammar and Linguistics / Graphic Novels / Hispanic, Latino/a, and Chicano/a Literature / Literary Theory/ Multicultural and World Literature / Native American Literature / Ohio Regional Writing / Pedagogy: Diversity in the English Curriculum, Service Learning, Active Learning or other/ Popular Culture / Post-Colonial Literature / Queer Studies / Religion and Literature / Teacher Education / Technical Communication (ATTW) / Visual and Material Culture / Women’s Connection, Women’s Literature, and WGST

CEAO welcomes proposals for:

  • poster sessions,
  • individual 15-20 minute sessions (including creative writing readings),
  • 60 minute panel sessions, and
  • 60 minute workshop sessions (all topics)

We seek submissions from full-time faculty, graduate students, adjunct and part-time instructors, as well as individuals living/working both inside and outside of Ohio. Faculty presenting projects with undergraduate students are also welcome. Proposals from faculty and administrators from institutions of all sizes and types—public, private, community—are encouraged to apply.

Send proposals of 300 words or fewer by Friday, March 20, 2020 through this link:   https://forms.gle/1HRpEGzwpnGveMFu9

  • All proposals submitted by the deadline will be considered. Questions? Please e-mail Barbara George: bgeorg15@kent.edu
  • Please visit: https://ceaoenglishnotes.com/ for additional information and for conference registration.  Presenters must be registered for the conference by the deadline.

 

 

2019 Spring Conference CFP

College English Association of Ohio
Spring Conference 2019

(Re)Claiming Our Voices:
Speaking and Writing in English Studies

University of Findlay Entrance
University of Findlay, Findlay, OH
Saturday, April 06, 2019

Keynote Speaker: Christine Denecker, University of Findlay

(Re)Claiming our voices in this turbulent political season informs our conference topic this year as we explore speaking, writing, and reading in English studies. Most of us are born with the ability to learn to vocalize, but how we are taught to claim our voices, and how to express ourselves (or how not to) creates distinction in our communication styles. Institutions of higher education should encourage students (and faculty) to use their “voices,” through writing and speaking in the classroom and in venues beyond the university. Students look to faculty for mentorship and examples to follow; if we aren’t claiming our voices, will they? It is this concept of speech both inside and outside the academy that will be our focus when we gather at the University of Findlay in 2019.

Findlay, is known as “Flag City, USA” thanks to the efforts of John Cooke, who in the 1960s voiced his belief that every American should fly the American flag on Flag Day. He worked to raise money to fund small flags enough for everyone in the community which eventually led to an official resolution of the U.S. House of Representatives on May 7, 1974 to give the city its nickname. One man. One voice. With the increased national focus on social justice issues and politics, CEAO encourages members to consider what differences could be made if we each used our voice toward positive change.

Possible topics might include:

  • Balancing speaking and writing in the classroom
  • Opening spaces for underrepresented voices
  • Designing courses to include diverse student voices
  • Quieting the [other] voices in our heads
  • Speaking our truths in English studies
  • Examining perceptions of the student voice in speaking and writing
  • Researching voice in the spoken and written word
  • Encouraging student voices
  • Bringing oppressed voices on college campuses into the conversation
  • Missing / lost voices in English studies
  • Speaking and writing “reset” in (re)claiming our voices
  • Engaging academic voices on campuses and in English departments

This year’s CEAO Spring Conference accepts proposals for individual 15-20 minute sessions or 60 minute panel sessions from full-time faculty, graduate students, adjunct and part-time instructors, as well as individuals living/working both inside and outside Ohio. We invite proposals for individual speakers, panels, roundtables, and creative works from all related fields in English studies including (but not limited to):

Literature Fields (Medieval, Renaissance, Global, Modernist, 18thCentury, etc.)
Literary Criticism
Creative Writing
Rhetoric and Composition
English Education
Linguistics / ESL
Basic Writing
Dual Enrollment

Submission Requirements:  Send proposals of no more than 300 words by Friday, March 8, 2019 to: ceaospringconference@gmail.com Creative writing submissions should include poetry or fiction/nonfiction suitable for a 20 minute reading. All proposals submitted by the deadline will be considered. In addition, include your name, academic rank, university affiliation, and a short 100-150 word biography in the email message. Technology (computers, projector, DVD, etc.) will be available for all presentations. Please note if you have a special technology request.

Participants may submit both a critical paper and a creative work, limited to one entry in each category, sent together as separate attachments in the same email. The Committee will notify entrants by March 22nd on the status of their proposal.
Please visit https://ceaoenglishnotes.com for additional information.  Presenters must be registered for the conference by the deadline.

Download a PDF of the call for proposals here: CEAO CFP 2019.

CEAO Spring Conference Call for Proposals

College English Association of Ohio
Spring Conference 2018
Ohio University: Athens, OH

Saturday, April 14, 2018

Freedom of Expression and English Studies

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Renea Frey, Xavier University

 

ohio-university-student-loses-presidency-and-scholarship-after-arrest-for-disorderly-intoxicationFreedom of speech and expression is a constitutional hallmark of American liberal education. Institutions of higher education have historically been sites of civil rights controversy surrounding freedom of speech and expression, as evidenced by protests on college campuses both now and in the past. As instructors of English with an interest in language, in its power dynamics and potential for creative change, we must recognize our positions at universities and colleges to weigh in on matters of free speech. Ever more essential to today’s cultural and political challenges, we must ask ourselves and each other: how do we, should we, and could we approach issues of free expression in the classroom? How do we consider our roles as faculty members, scholars, students, and citizens contributing to this contemporary and weighty topic?

Student-protests-at-entrace-to-Ohio-University-inn-1970

Athens—the conference site for 2018—is historically linked to protest and active democracy. From its ancient namesake in fourth century BCE Greece, to protests in Ohio against the war during the Vietnam era, to current controversies surrounding students’ rights to protest, Athens has been long associated with a tradition of speaking out and free expression.

Possible topics might include:

  • Balancing free expression with safety in the classroom
  • Securing academic freedom in research pursuits
  • Encouraging free speech and respect for diversity amongst students
  • Engaging the debate between free speech and safe zones
  • Interrogating “off limits” topics in the classroom
  • Opening spaces for underrepresented voices in public spaces
  • Responding to hate speech on college campuses
  • Considering how place and postionality affect free expression
  • Designing courses to include diverse student voices
  • Situating notions of “activism” within the field of English studies

 

This year’s CEAO Spring Conference will take up the theme of “Freedom of Expression and English Studies” and accepts proposals for individual 15-20 minute sessions or 60 minute panel sessions from full-time faculty, graduate students, adjunct and part-time instructors, as well as individuals living/working both inside and outside Ohio. We invite proposals for individual speakers, panels, roundtables, and creative works from all related fields in English studies including (but not limited to):

Literature Fields (Medieval, Renaissance, Global, Modernist, 18th Century, etc.)
Literary Criticism                  Creative Writing                     Rhetoric and Composition
English Education                   Linguistics/ESL                       Basic Writing

 

Submission Requirements: Send proposals of no more than 300 words by Friday, March 9, 2018 to: ceaospringconference@gmail.com   Creative writing submissions should include poetry or fiction/nonfiction suitable for a 20 minute reading. All proposals submitted by the deadline will be considered. In addition, include your name, academic rank, university affiliation, and a short 100-150 word biography in the email message. Technology (computers, projector, DVD, etc.) will be available for all presentations. Please note if you have a special technology request.

Participants may submit both a critical paper and a creative work, limited to one entry in each category, sent together as separate attachments in the same email. We will notify entrants by March 23rd on the status of their proposal.

 

Please visit https://ceaoenglishnotes.com for additional information. Presenters must be registered for the conference by the deadline.

 

Download a PDF copy of the CEAO CFP 2018 for distribution.